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Outdoor Research Igneo Jacket Men's

by Frederick Reimers - published November, 2012

86

2014

THE GOOD

  • Good wet-weather rig
  • Helmet compatible hood
  • Lots of pockets for stashing gear for sidecountry missions
  • Removable powder skirt
  • Very good price

THE BAD

  • Too little insulation
  • A little baggy
  • Crinkly shell

THE VERDICT

The Igneo has such a slight amount of insulation that it is sort of a tweener—not quite a shell, not quite an insulated jacket. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it might be hard to justify a spot in the closet for it. It has some great features like Recco and pockets right where you want them, excellent waterproofness and breathability, etc. without a big price tag. The fit is on the baggy side, even for a freeride rig.

FULL REVIEW

Materials
The outer shell is Pertex Shield, which performs as well as other waterproof breathable fabrics for a better price. It does tend to be a bit crinkly, however. The Igneo is insulated with a moderate amount of Thermore synthetic insulation. The seams are taped and the zippers sealed for total waterproofing. We weren’t able to soak the jacket through, even in some drizzly conditions on Mount Hood, but it’s nice to know the Igneo would have kept us warm even had we.

Features
The Igneo has a ton of bells and whistles. We like the season pass pocket stashed under the left hem, as well as the zip-out powder skirt. We always like RECCO, which gives ski patrol a way to find a skier who is buried in-bounds or who wandered out of bounds. Internal mesh pockets can hold goggles, extra gloves, and even a pair of climbing skins for sidecountry missions. The large chest pockets are capable of the same, and are situated above your pack’s waist belt. There’s a funky thing called Thumb Drive where you can loop the long Velcro-backed wrist enclosure up over your thumb for extra snugness. If you find it to be a strange feature, it’s easy to ignore.

The Igneo is built for wet weather, with synthetic insulation, a large hood, taped seams, waterproof zippers and a beefy storm flap. One complaint is they could have saved some weight and bulk by eliminating the hood’s zip-off capability—with a hood large enough to fit over any helmet, there’s no reason to remove it. Pit zips are large, which means good ventilation if things get steamy. I’m a normal-sized guy, but I found the freeride fit to be a little too generous (which can cause cold draft issues).

How We Tested It

Six different testers skied slopes from Whistler to Utah, to Jackson Hole. Wet weather testing went down at Oregon’s Mount Hood Meadows.

The products featured in this test have been loaned to the Gear Institute. For more on our policies regarding editorial objectivity and sample returns, see here.


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RATINGS

Durability
7
Weatherproofness
9
Bells & Whistles
9
Fit
5
Breathability
8
Value
8
GEAR INSTITUTE RATING
86

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Specs

  • Pit zips: large
  • Gender: Men's
  • Fall 2012

Weight

2 lbs , 8 oz

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