Gear Institute Expert Test Menu

Mountain Hardwear Ozonic 70

- published May 2017

89

2017

RATINGS

Comfort/Fit
7
Storage
9
Stability
7
Durability
7
Extras
9
GEAR INSTITUTE RATING
89

SHOP

MSRP
LOW PRICE
$280.00
Support Gear Institute. If you make a purchase after clicking on the links above, a portion of the sale helps support this site.

THE GOOD

  • Light
  • Very good water resistance
  • Simple and efficient body design

THE BAD

  • Small top brain pocket
  • Stiff frame
  • Some seam concerns

THE VERDICT

The Mountain Hardwear Ozonic 70 Outdry tied for third in this test set. It’s best feature is its namesake Outdry technology, which gives it the best water resistance in the set. It’s biggest concern are some seam concerns, particularly at the top of the shoulder strap.

FULL REVIEW

Comfort/Fit
The comfort of the Ozonic 70 Outdry is impacted by the stiff frame, which restricts the natural movement of the spine. The upper and mid back sections are padded with blocks that may not fit well with all back shapes, and there is a gap between the upper back block and the start of the shoulder strap padding. The waist strap is lightly padded, and uses a strange cinch system that keeps all the adjustment on the user’s right, on the male side of the buckle. There is a seam between the lower back padding and the waist strap that can cause some rubbing. The shoulder strap is attached to the frame on the bottom with two pieces of webbing, which can be simultaneously adjusted with an innovative loop cinch system. 

Storage
The Ozonic is better at compressing than expanding, which is limited by the the roll-top closure on the top of the body compartment and the narrowness of the compartment. The compressibility is also limited by the brain buckles, which connect to the body at a relatively high point. There are two gear straps on the bottom of the seat, and they feed through a loop halfway across, which helps with fastening skinny solo tents. There is a large back sleeve with one zippered pocket and one open pocket. Thanks to the Outdry system, the body compartment can be accessed only at the roll-top closure at the top of the compartment. The brain is removable for those looking to shed a few ounces. 

Stability
This category proved to be one of the Ozonic’s worst, since the waist straps only provide a very basic level of pivot. The body compartment is relatively narrow, which leads to a high center of gravity, particularly when the the bag is over-packed. A lateral Z-cinch on each side and back sleeve provide a good level of compressibility. 

Durability
The plastic buckles on this bag are light but also sturdy, thanks to an internal reinforcement on all of the female side buckles. The seams are probably the sturdiest in the test set, and the seat is definitely the most reinforced of the set. It didn’t rain enough during the Ozonic’s field test to put Mountain Hardwear’s “100% waterproof” claim to the test, so we loaded it up and put it in the shower, and can confirm the claim’s validity, which helped earn this pack top marks. 

Extras
The Ozonic has two small hip pouches on the waist strap, one of which is mesh while the other is water resistant. There is a whistle on the sternum strap. The back of the pack has two gear loops for trekking poles or technical climbing gear, both of which can be used with either of two medium sized loops.

How We Tested It

The packs in this test were used throughout the winter and spring of 2017, during day hikes and overnight backpacking trips from 1-4 nights, with mileage hovering around a dozen miles a day. Tests were conducted on Maryland’s Western Shore, in the Olympic Range of Washington State, the Cascades of the Pacific Northwest, and in the central Sierra Nevada. This geographic diversity of conditions allowed for a look into each pack’s strengths and weakness. Each pack had at least 20 pounds in them, and some had as much as double that. 

For more reviews beyond this 2017 test, check out our Best Weekend Backpacking Tents of 2017 and Best One Person Backpacking Tents of 2017, along with our sleeping bag tests and stove tests, as well as other related hiking and camping gear tests

The products featured in this test have been loaned to the Gear Institute. For more on our policies regarding editorial objectivity and sample returns, see here.

About the Author

Scott Morris

Scott Morris

Scott Morris guides backpacking expeditions and hiking trips for Southern Yosemite Mountain Guides throughout the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. He is a writer, traveler, and runner. Scott tests backpacking equipment. 

Shop for the Mountain Hardwear Ozonic 70

MSRP
LOW PRICE

$280.00
Support Gear Institute. If you make a purchase after clicking on the links above, a portion of the sale helps support this site.

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
MSRP
LOW PRICE
$280.00
Support Gear Institute. If you make a purchase after clicking on the links above, a portion of the sale helps support this site.

RATINGS

Comfort/Fit
7
Storage
9
Stability
7
Durability
7
Extras
9
GEAR INSTITUTE RATING
89

Specs

  • Type of Backpack: Expedition Pack
  • Volume (unverified): 70 L

Weight

4 lbs 2 oz

Jump To